Updates

PRESERVING OUR BLUE RIDGE SCENERY

We knocked on tens of thousands of doors to shine a spotlight on a hidden provision in the state budget that prevented land conservation along the Blue Ridge Parkway. Lawmakers removed the prohibition in their 2012-2013 budget, and began to restore devastating cuts to land conservation programs.

News Release | Environment North Carolina Research and Policy Center

Report: 20 percent solar in reach

RALEIGH, NC –Solar power is growing so quickly in North Carolina that goals once considered ambitious are now readily achievable, according to a new report by Environment North Carolina Research & Policy Center.

“We can get to 20% solar in North Carolina by 2030 if we just keep our foot on the accelerator,” said Maya Gold, Clean Energy Associate with Environment North Carolina. “That’s a small fraction of what’s possible, but it will make a big difference in the quality of our lives and the future of our planet.”

The group’s researchers found that North Carolina’s solar capacity has grown 127% in recent years. At a fifth of this pace, solar could still generate 20% of North Carolina’s electricity within 15 years— a goal once thought improbable by many.

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Report | Environment North Carolina Research and Policy Center

Star Power

North Carolina could meet its energy needs by capturing just a sliver of the virtually limitless and pollution-free energy that strikes the state every day in the form of sunlight. With solar installation costs falling, the efficiency of solar cells rising, and the threats of air pollution and global warming ever-looming, solar power is becoming a more attractive and widespread source of energy every day.

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News Release | Environment North Carolina

Commission approves final fracking rules, leaves public comment out

Raleigh, NC.- After just three meetings of deliberation, the Mining and Energy Commission finalized its package of 120 rules to govern fracking, the controversial driling technique that could begin in North Carolina as soon as May of next year. Commissioners made few changes to reflect the more than 217,000 public comments they received.
 
“These rules are a totally inadequate, and the process by which they've been rushed through to adoption is irresponsible," said Liz Kazal, Environment North Carolina field associate. “These rules make clear that the only way to truly protect our air and water is to keep fracking out of the state.”

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News Release | Environment North Carolina Research and Policy Center

New report highlights progress for North Fork First Broad River, calls for more success stories

Raleigh, NC.-On the eve of the close of the public comment period for the new Clean Water Rule, a new report tells the story of how the bedrock environmental law has helped to restore and protect the North Fork First Broad River from development and pollution.

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Report | Environment North Carolina Research and Policy Center

Waterways Restored

In the early 1970s, many American rivers and streams were environmental basket cases – lined with industrial facilities dumping toxic pollution virtually unchecked, choked with untreated sewage and trash, and, in many cases, devoid of aquatic life.

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