The Atlantic Coast won a major victory when the Obama administration abandoned its plans to open the southern Atlantic to offshore oil and gas drilling for the first time in decades. Leading up to the announcement, Environment America and colleagues presented Obama officials with letters signed by more than 1,000 East Coast businesses opposed to the drilling proposal.

News Release | Environment North Carolina Research and Policy Center

Report: Big-box stores could save big, reduce pollution by going solar

Raleigh, NC- Big-box stores, grocery chains, and shopping centers in North Carolina could cut pollution and save $246 million dollars with rooftop solar, a new report said today.
The Environment North Carolina Research and Policy Center analysis, Solar on Superstores, found that Target, Home Depot, and other large retailers could avert 2.2 million metric tons of carbon pollution annually if they used all their available roof space for solar panels.

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Report | Environment North Carolina Research and Policy Center

Solar on Superstores

Solar energy is expanding rapidly across the United States – increasing more than 100-fold over the past decade. But, there are still many untapped opportunities to harness the nation’s nearly limitless solar potential. The United States has the technical potential to produce more than 100 times as much electricity from solar photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) installations as the nation consumes each year.

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News Release | Environment North Carolina

Tourism, marine life highlighted among top reasons North Carolinians love the coast

Raleigh, NC- With Valentine’s Day around the corner, Environment North Carolina Research and Policy Center released the Top Ten Reasons why millions of Americans love to visit North Carolina’s coasts each year. The factsheet comes as more and more coastal communities take a stand against offshore drilling off North Carolina’s shores.

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Report | Environment America

America’s Next Top Polluter

Tyson Foods, Inc. is “one of the world’s largest producers of meat and poultry.” The company’s pollution footprint includes manure from its contract growers’ factory farm operations, fertilizer runoff from grain grown to feed the livestock it brings to market as meat, and waste from its processing plants.

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