North Carolina’s wind blows strong 

The winds off North Carolina’s coast powered the Wright Brothers’ first flight in 1903, and they’ve been going strong ever since. In fact, just over 100 years after the first flight, converting just a fraction of the winds off our shores to energy could provide all of North Carolina’s energy needs. 

North Carolina moving backwards on energy?

Despite our enormous potential for offshore wind energy, too many in North Carolina’s General Assembly are focused on the energy sources of the past — which pollute the air and water and could threaten our beaches with devastating toxic spills. At the same time, though we have more offshore wind potential than any other Atlantic Coast state, North Carolina is falling behind its neighbors when it comes to developing wind energy.

North Carolina can make history, again

The Wright Brothers’ took a giant leap forward when they took off at Kitty Hawk 108 years ago. North Carolina has an enormous opportunity to do the same with offshore wind, making our state not only “first in flight” but “first in wind.” 

The first step in charting our future in offshore wind is for North Carolina’s leaders to support extending federal tax incentives vital for both onshore and offshore wind power production.

The coal and oil lobby is urging Congress to let these tax credits expire, which would mean the loss of 37,000 jobs along with increased pollution.

That is why Environment North Carolina is calling the state’s leaders to take advantage of North Carolina’s offshore wind potential by supporting extending the wind energy tax credit.  It’s time to make history, again.


Clean energy updates

Report | Environment America Research & Policy Center

10 Ways to Help Your City Go Solar

Last month's Shining Cities report detailed how cities are good for solar and solar is good for cities. We've seen some impressive strides across the nation to momentously expand our solar capabilities. But we're not where we need to be yet. To obtain a clean energy future your cities and towns need to do even more. Here's how to push them in the right direction! 

> Keep Reading
News Release | Environment North Carolina Research and Policy Center

Raleigh earns berth in “sweet sixteen” for solar power

Raleigh, NC – Raleigh has more solar panels than most major American cities, ranking 13th among dozens of metropolitan areas analyzed in a new report. The Oak City’s berth in the “solar sweet sixteen,” just behind Albuquerque and ahead of Sacramento, is a result of a significant growth of rooftop solar in the city.

> Keep Reading
Report | Environment North Carolina Research and Policy Center

Shining Cities

The use of solar power is expanding rapidly across the United States. By the end of 2014, the United States had 20,500 megawatts (MW) of cumulative solar electric capacity, enough to power four million average U.S. homes. This success is the outcome of federal, state and local programs that are working in concert to make solar power accessible to more Americans, thereby cleaning our air, protecting our health, and hedging against volatile electricity prices.

> Keep Reading
News Release | Environment North Carolina Research and Policy Center

Report: wind energy could reduce pollution equal to five coal plants

Raleigh, NC -- The carbon pollution from five coal plants could be eliminated in North Carolina if wind power is developed off the North Carolina coast, according to a new analysis by Environment North Carolina Research and Policy Center. The report comes right as Congress considers whether to renew tax credits critical to wind development.

> Keep Reading
Report | Environment North Carolina Research and Policy Center

More Wind, Less Warming

Wind power is on the rise across America. The United States generates 24 times more electricity from wind power than we did in 2001, providing clean, fossil fuel-free energy that helps the nation do its part in the fight against global warming.

> Keep Reading

Pages

View AllRSS Feed